Tag Archive | planning

Is data really the new creative brief?

Last week, a few idiology teamsters dropped into the Contagious Now/Next/Why event at St Luke’s LSO in London. A fleet of fantastic speakers took to the stage to present the latest trends in Perceptive Media, Social Business and Marketing as Service Design – topics of huge relevance and of enormous interest to us. Throughout the hugely diverse presentations, “data” seemed to be the word on everyone’s lips – something we’ve noticed increasingly in the press as well as in meetings with clients. We couldn’t help but wade into the discussion via Twitter when it was suggested that “data is the new creative brief”.

Check out the full article on our idiology blog.

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Progress through technology

This is another article that I wrote for the the APG strategy corner in New Business magazine. Although this article is not particularly about Audi, it is about pushing the boundaries of using technology in a useful way and about how planning can help brands to choose the right technology.

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Planners Get A Check-Up

In comparison to many other jobs, planning is kind of a niche discipline. The group of planners around the world really like to connect and understand their own craft better. A good way to do that, is to join the annual planner survey. The German Account Planning Group just released this year’s planning survey.

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Watching how trends & creativity become contagious

“Influencers is a short documentary that explores what it means to be an influencer and how trends and creativity become contagious today in music, fashion and entertainment. The film attempts to understand the essence of influence, what makes a person influential without taking a statistical or metric approach.”

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A Digital Planning Review

Yes I know, everyone talks about digital. And everyone wants to do it. Especially for planners, it’s one of the topics that you cannot lose sight of. Most recently I had some interesting conversations with planning colleagues and I found out that there are basically three types of positions in the discussion. The first group are the real traditionalists who still think that digital is a hyped topic and some even argue that there is no such thing as digital planning and strategy. The second group are awed traditional planners who are a little bit intimidated by digital and see it as a huge mystery. And the third group are the planners who work in and with digital and wonder what all the fuzz is about. Because they don’t make a big difference.

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